Increased salaries, new managerial skills acquired and the possibility of making a career by highlighting with recruiters: these are the most important benefits of attending a MBA. The often exorbitantly expensive specialist courses seem to be safe to invest in, looking at the results of a Financial Times survey of former students on America’s most prestigious courses.

HOW MUCH DOES INVESTMENT IN A MBA MAKE?

On average, those who have attended one of the 100 best MBA programs in the world have seen their previous salary double over three years. The former students of Bulloch, at Stanford, in second place in the 2017 ranking, have seen the investment return quickly: after giving up an average income of $ 100,000 a year, three years after the end of the courses earn $ 200,000. Half earn former students at Iowa’s Tippie College Business (84 places), although they do better at +130% of their pre-Mba income.

“The economic benefits of this investment are a factor they certainly take into account, but students start with the idea that the MBA can help them fulfill their dreams,” says Ft David Deyak, assistant rector at Tippie. That means changing jobs, industry and even country. Not to be underestimated the personal impact of a Mba that allows you to create a network.

A YEAR’S BEES ARE YOUR FAVOURITES

No wonder, then, the numbers: in 2016 applications for membership for the MBA of just one year – the preferred mode for updates in areas not in step with the times – increased by 57%. Those who enrol in diploma courses in two years are more likely to receive scholarships: 48% against 36% of annual students. Shorter programs still deliver more value than the money spent.

If for many students who want to attend a MBA program the time to spend on it is certainly a topic to be considered more, candidates often self-select in the face of the high costs involved. Even if they know that they can come back from that investment in a short time.

Another advantage, and not the least, is the financing of his training. Indeed, the tuition fees are paid (in part) by the host company and the “apprentice” receives a salary calculated on a percentage of the minimum wage or the conventional minimum wage. Provided that you prepare your training within the framework of a standard contract (apprenticeship, professionalisation), or even according to the principle of alternate training (training allowances). Other forms may be similar to the system of alternation but without really offering any financial advantages. This is the case for MS on a part-time basis, which are primarily aimed at active managers. At EM Normandie, the great majority of MS integrate the pedagogical mode of HEC Entrepreneurs including the realization of 2 to 4 missions in companies (according to the programs) from 4 to 5 weeks each in addition to an internship at the end of studies from 4 to 6 months.